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Trentham Vic 3458

Open 7 days Click and Collect

A5 Journal - Indigenous Artist Designs

$15.00 $15.00
Design

A5 Journal.

A5 Journal - Hard Cover
100 Pages
Lined Pages (one side) - 100gsm

Choose from three designs 

ALMA GRANITES

Based on the artwork 'Star or Seven Sisters Dreaming' by Alma Granites. Includes information about the artist and artwork. 

"I want my art to tell the story of my ancestors and be able to show the world my culture and my traditions."
Alma Nungarrayi Granites lives in Yuendumu, an Aboriginal community located Northwest of Alice Springs. She is the daughter of Paddy Japaljarri Sims (Dec) and Bessie Nakamarra Sims both founding artists of Warlukurlangu Artists. She paints a large array of stories all of which have been passed down to her from her father and generations before him. All her paintings tell creation stories that relate to the artists traditional country. She has been painting with Warlukurlangu Artists since 1987. In 2007 she decided to explore her painting skill in more depth; she started working at the art centre every day to produce a body of work that has expanded her knowledge of the dreaming (Jukurrpa) as well as the development of her unique technical artistic style. She is a strong participant of Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre in Yuendumu, and has exhibited in group exhibitions nationally and internationally, culminating in two solo shows, one in Singapore in 2010 and one in Germany in 2011. In 2010 she completed an Artist in Residency at the Australian Pavillion World Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China.

DANCING WOMBAT - Mick Harding

Aboriginal art in Victoria is unique in its symbolism. It links with our stories and songlines like fingers reaching out to other areas of Australia.

When I create something I express my cultural integrity in place, be respectful of interpretation of my culture, and share my story as a Taungwurrung Kulin (Aboriginal man from my traditional country).  

“We are the first peoples of this land and have an ongoing responsibility to keep
our culture alive and relevant in our current society. We belong to this land”

We encourage our children to express their creative minds to keep alive for the future.  
“Our children’s future, Our culture, Your culture”

Ngarga Warendj – Dancing Wombat produces high quality contemporary Indigenous Art, using designs based on traditional symbols from South-East Australia.

BETTY MORTON - My Country & Bush Medicine

The community of Ampilatwatja made a conscious decision not to paint 'altyerr' dreaming stories.  The artists paint their country where those stories sit.  Betty has painted her country, where she can always find bush tucker and bush medicine.  She is very happy when out bush hunting and gathering, it is when she feels most connected to country and culture.  She draws her inspiration from being out on the land, especially from the hunting and gathering trips where she sees the different seasonal plants, bush foods and medicines, that are producing at that time and observes the ever changing layered landscapes.

"They are always changing, with the light of day and the seasons of the year"

Betty enjoys and understands the importance of painting bush medicine plants.  They help in the healing of her people and it keeps the tradition and knowledge strong.  These particular plants are very plentiful after rain and can be used for numerous conditions, such as skin irritations, flu, coughs and infections.

"Bush medicine plants are used for healing on the body and for drinking.  We make this by smashing the plants with a rock, we use the juice and the fibre of the plant.  We collect bush medicine plants when we are out hunting.  Different kinds of plants grow during different seasons.  There are lots of different medicines, we know what their stories as we learnt them our parents and we teach those stories to our children."